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Surprising Activities That Are Good For The Brain

by Marie Vonow (follow)
Chief editor: readyforpets.com Blogs:https://minamaries.blogspot.com.au https://simpleselfimprovement.blogspot.com.au/
Stress (61)      Balance (56)      Brain (7)      Colouring In (2)      Dancing (2)      Dementia (2)      Games (1)     
It's not surprising to hear working on tricky word or number puzzles is beneficial to the brain. However, some of the activities one may do during 'down time' were once believed to be non productive or a waste of time. Research is now finding they are in fact good for the brain.



Board game
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Board games
People have long realised chess involves strategy and problem solving skills so have accepted its value to giving the brain a workout.

However, games like Monopoly make use of deductive reasoning, critical thinking and number skills. They are not just something to do to keep the children occupied when the power is off.

Word games can increase a person's vocabulary. Board games like draughts which involve thought and strategy boost the memory. In fact most board games are a fun way to keep the brain active and decrease the risk of dementia.

Jigsaws
Doing a jigsaw puzzles uses both sides of the brain. Studies show doing jigsaw puzzles regularly keeps the brain active and helps reduce the risk of dementia.

Putting together a jigsaw also produces a meditative type state and can reduce stress. As stress is destructive to the brain, relieving stress is beneficial.



Board game
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Colouring in
Colouring in was once seen as an activity only suitable for children, and young children at that. Many felt it was more of a 'busy work' activity to give children something to do while adults got on with jobs they needed to do.

In recent times colouring in books aimed at adults have become very popular. Many find the activity relieves stress and psychologists have found it relaxes the amygdala which is the brain's fear centre.

The act of colouring in trains the brain to focus and concentrate on the activity which means a person is living in the moment.

In addition colouring promotes organisational and problem solving skills. Colouring uses both sides of the brain at the same time.

Floating around in the pool or at the beach
Yes, we know going for a swim is good for our physical health because we are getting exercise. However, just floating around is good for your brain. (Swimming is good for the brain too, but the point is you don't have to swim.) Simply immersing your body in water up to heart level increases blood flow to the brain.

Dancing
It's easy to realise when we dance we exercise but our brain gets a workout as well. Research has found regular dancing may lower the risk of dementia by as much as 76 per cent. Dancing uses several areas of the brain at once as one remembers the steps, coordinates with a partner and moves in time to the music. read more about the benefits of dancing



Two People Dancing
Image courtesy of Pixabay

Day dreaming
Daydreaming tends to be something one doesn't intend to do. It just happens. Daydreaming helps the brain process information. Studies have found day dreaming can be an important part of goal setting, creativity and making discoveries. In fact researchers think people are most creative when they are daydreaming.

If you are participating in any activity which relieves stress, it is doing your brain good. Chronic stress kills brain cells and also slows down the rate at which new brain cells are produced. It also has a negative impact on memory and causes premature aging of the brain. As you can see there is no need to feel guilty about spending time chilling out as part of a balanced lifestyle.


# Balance
# Brain
# Colouring In
# Dancing
# Dementia
# Games
# Stress
I like this Article - 5
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This is a brilliant article, Marie. I really enjoyed it! I will feel better about doing my colouring in now!!
Justine
Thanks, Justine. I was so happy when I found out daydreaming is good for one's brain. I used to feel guilty about letting my mind wander when sitting on the train or enjoying time out the back of my house. I used to think I should be reading r doing something constructive. Now I can enjoy daydreaming because it is good for my brain and because I just love doing it. Have fun with your colouring in!
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